Leading contract fabric company Douglass Industries has introduced two imaginative and versatile lines with INCASE Crypton Technology. The Karma and Safari Collections each offer spirited patterns, lush colors and soulful inspiration.

Good Karma Only

For designers looking to add good vibes to any project, the Karma Collection may be just the thing to add lively or calm energy to a space, depending on the design vision. Karma’s whimsical colorations work in perfect harmony with one another, with warm complementing cool. Patterns with thematic names such as Chance, Serendipity and Destiny range from smart geometrics and comforting organics to multi-color textures.

The Douglass Karma Collection with INCASE Crypton Technology.

The Douglass Karma Collection with INCASE Crypton Technology. Clockwise from top left, five of the patterns shown in harmonious color ways: Serendipity in Nut Brown, Kismet in Turquoise, Fortune in Green/Blue, Destiny in Aquamarine and Witty in Everglade.

Standout patterns include the subtle kaleidoscope look of Kismet, the abstract leaf and berry pattern Serendipity, and Triumph, where crisp stripes underlay an interlocked geometric design which is soft and welcoming.

The intricate Fortune pattern looks as if it may have been inspired by ancient woven textiles, with tiny diamond and pyramid shapes in neat rows creating a stripe effect. The patterned “stripes” align in both sophisticated combinations such as Gilded, a mix of gold, ivory, taupe and toast hues, and radiant bursts of color such as those in Flamingo with its warm pinks and deep corals mixing with nut brown tones. The range also includes calming combinations from nature like the sea and sand palette of the Caribbean colorway, and versatile palettes such as the turquoise, copper and aquamarine tone of Green/Blue.

The designers say the Karma Collection all happened for a reason. “Call it fate, destiny or happenstance; these patterns were meant to be together,” says the Douglass team. Each fabric meets or exceeds 50,000 double rubs, 50 lbs. seam slippage and is finished with INCASE Crypton Technology for applications needing a permanent stain repellent.

Go on Safari

Sometimes a design calls for textiles that can, simultaneously, soothe and mesmerize, while appearing hand-wrought and sophisticated. Douglass has created a group of distinctive, hand-crafted selections that accomplish all of that. Perfect for the hospitality market, the Safari Collection is inspired by the lush textures of African scenery. The patterns incorporate the beautiful contrasts of this vast and fascinating continent, with textiles drawn from the vibrant whir of cosmopolitan cities like Nairobi, to the warm and spiritual art and culture found in remote villages and the wild, natural expanses of Africa from bush to veld to savanna.

Pattern inspirations come from things such as thatched roofs made of river reeds, dried clay, seashell-embellished tribal garments and hand-woven baskets. The wonderful African handmade textiles are also at play here, with patterns drawn from batik and Kuba cloths.

The Safari Collection with INCASE Crypton Technology shown in tones of gold and copper. From top: Nuru, Tadala and Dayo.

The Safari Collection with INCASE Crypton Technology shown in tones of black, gray and copper. Top-to-bottom: Nuru in Stoneware, Swahili in Bark Cloth, Tadala in Elephant and Dayo in Onyx.

These richly woven, textural fabrics embody the rich and varied colors of the continent that inspired them. Some are reflective of the region’s countryside with its rich earth tones influenced by natural dyes from roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood. Others come from the landscape’s warm desert to cool ocean tones. Some are drawn from the exotic and diverse animals themselves that, if you are lucky, you might see on safari, such as the pale grey of the Rhino, charcoal grey of the Hippo, the warm caramel of the Giraffe and deep dark chocolate in Buffalo.

Some of the most dramatic hues in the line are clearly taken from the distinctly moving and memorable African skies, which change color with so much drama it is nearly impossible not to be mesmerized. Clearly these designers were stirred by the intense reds and oranges of Daybreak and Sunset and drawn to the mysterious and haunting sky blues in Twilight, Dusk and Nightfall. Anyone who has been fortunate enough to gaze up at the night sky in remote bushland seeking a glimpse at the Southern Cross would recognize these colors, deftly taken from nature and interpreted here.

A leader in contract textiles, Douglass Industries provides seating and panel fabrics to a broad spectrum of design markets including hospitality, office, senior living, acute care, education and government. Crypton proudly partners with Douglass to create contract textiles with the highest level of aesthetic integrity along with enduring properties of spill, stain and odor-resistance suitable for high-traffic contract applications. All of the Douglass Crypton textiles are woven in the United States.


New from the Arc-Com Design Studio, the award-winning Foundation Collection featuring INCASE Crypton Technology is an example of the kinds of thoughtful, conceptual performance textiles we’re seeing for 2018. We’re calling the trend “full circle architecture,” where concepts from historical architecture are transformed into fabric that in turn get installed inside new architecture. Imaginative design minds take fascinating and timeless ideas from antiquity and re-scale, recolor, reconfigure and re-imagine them in new ways. These patterns draw from the tools, techniques, methodology and geometry that were used to craft and build Europe’s magnificent cathedrals. Beyond the forms, the new Arc-Com collection is also inspired by the human spirit that went into these structures. Amanda Eaton, VP of Design at Arc-Com, sat down with us to offer our readers the inside scoop on how the Arc-Com design team created this bold, textural new contract fabric option.

Certainly people were meant to be awed by these immense and elaborate structures. Upon entering into these vast spaces, one can’t help but wonder how on earth people were able to build these immense, towering structures when mechanization was so limited. Ms. Eaton, upon first seeing Notre Dame as a teenager, wondered, “How were they able to construct these incredible buildings at a time when there was no electricity or automated power source or even running water?” Her fascination with these inspiring structures stayed with her, and now she has deftly explored it with her team in a collection that delves into both process and craft. In researching the methods and techniques used, the Arc-Com design studio found these to be not only technically fascinating but also visually inspiring. The Foundation Collection is the beautifully edited, gracefully interpreted expression of their findings.

Windlass pattern
Windlass inspiration

A windlass was a cathedral builder’s tool that was used to lift heavy stones and building materials. It was powered by a worker positioned inside a giant wooden wheel. That person’s job was to tread the wheel around, so ropes that wound around the axle on one end and were attached to heavy items on the other moved the heavy things up to the desired position. Graphic and modern, the Windlass fabric pattern shows the parallel planking of the wheel punctuated with fine lines of light in various configurations.

Vault pattern
Vault inspiration

Who among us hasn’t stared up in wide-eyed wonder at the ancient vaulted ceiling of a great cathedral? How can it not inspire something? The Vault patterns sleek interpretation of the arched forms or rib-vaulting used in cathedral ceilings also has an intricate background pattern, which returns on its own as a direct coordinate in Oculus.

Oculus pattern
Oculus inspiration

Inspired by classical rose windows, Oculus is the direct coordinate fabric to the Vault pattern. Its lace-like framework is is a finely scaled repeat of rose window layouts. It gets its name from the oculus, or round opening, in a wall inside which the familiar rose fretwork is found.

Lunette pattern
Lunette inspiration

Lunette, from the French, meaning “little moon,” celebrates the many crescent-shaped spaces and forms found in cathedrals. The textile pattern exuberantly tosses these smiley crescents across a solid field in an all-over pattern with just enough randomness to move the eye, but configured so that each one touches the tip of a neighboring crescent at both ends. Nothing is left hanging in this charming, modern-feeling design.

Centring pattern
Centring inspiration

A centring was a wooden structure used in construction to hold an arch in place, supporting the stones as the build progressed. The fabric pattern Centring Stripe offers a truly unique stripe option for designers. Its strings of elongated diamond shapes re-tell the story of these humble wooden scaffolds, unsung heroes of architecture like the men who made them. They were split from virgin timber and painstakingly sawn into slender spans that were set at angles with hand-forged nails, only to be cast aside once a perfect stone arch was achieved.

Mason Stripe pattern
Mason Stripe inspiration

Mason Stripe is a versatile, small-scale stripe with a hand-drawn quality, thanks to its nod to the precise yet granular masonry of stone cathedrals. Along with Windlass and Lunette, Mason Stripe is woven in a beautiful, textural bouclé, so not only does the pattern offer a virtual texture, but also the fabric itself has a touchable, soft dimensionality that adds an inviting richness to the upholstery.

The Arc-Com Foundation Collection was recently honored with the prestigious the Best of the Year Award (BoY) from Interior Design Magazine. BoY is a global design award dedicated to the year’s best products and projects. Arc-Com’s Foundation Collection was recognized as the winner in the Healthcare Textile space for its design innovation and inspiration. The award was announced in December, 2017.

With Foundation, Ms. Eaton and her team at the Arc-Com design studio have delivered a collection firmly rooted in architectural and human history. It speaks to the enduring nature of design and the triumph of the human spirit. Simultaneously it delivers a universal design message with a modern appeal that will surely be at home inside the great buildings of tomorrow. Plus, thanks to its INCASE Crypton Technology, it will last long into that future and help keep the furniture it adorns in good shape, too. How will you use it? Please let us know. We’d love to feature your installations in this space.


One of the most exciting trends in contract fabric is a move toward intense, distinctive colors and exciting patterns. This new trend breaks through all of the myths about design limitations with contract performance fabrics. These looks could fall into the realm of any luxury interior textile, yet they offer the extraordinary performance required for more demanding spaces.

Brentano’s Cityscape Collection is one example of this design revolution. It captures the urban landscape in textile form. Design Director, Iris Wang, and the Brentano design studio were inspired by all senses stimulated within the metropolitan environment. They cite among their references towering skyscrapers, perpetual movement and the energetic sounds that pulse through any city.

The new collection includes vivid colors and graphic, large-scale patterns such as Boulevard. This bold stripe is an interpretation of the grandest type of urban street. It celebrates a tradition of generously scaled avenues, the type that have become destinations in and of themselves. The color and life of the Champs-Élysées, Park Avenue, Wilshire Boulevard and so many more are set down with style on a focal-point-ready textile.

Boulevard pattern from the Cityscape Collection by Brentano

Boulevard pattern from the Cityscape Collection by Brentano

INCASE Crypton Technology protects seven of the collection’s patterns and is suitable for hospitality, retail, office, education, healthcare and residential interiors. It works for all applications where performance is a must but a moisture barrier is not required.

If The New Yorker was a contract fabric, it would be Cityscape (see featured image at top of this post). The collection’s namesake pattern is a madcap mashup of hand-illustrated skyscrapers. Cityscape (somehow) creates the overall impression of a loose geometric crossed with an animal print. It offers the intellectual energy of the urban jungle juxtaposed with just enough whimsy.

Even the small-scale coordinates such as Metropolis and Boomtown and an uber-textural, micro-chevron pattern called Disco push the limits of expected design. Built for high-performance applications, all of the Cityscape patterns offer outstanding wearability, exceeding over 75,000 double rubs (Wyzenbeek).

Boomtown (left) and Metropolis (right) patterns from the Cityscape Collection by Brentano.

Boomtown (left) and Metropolis (right) patterns from the Cityscape Collection by Brentano.

Perhaps you’ve already specified some bold beauty from the Cityscape Collection and want to share it with us? Please do! You may see your work in an upcoming post in this space.


Architects and designers tell us that in their contract projects, one of the most frequent questions from the client side involves not aesthetics, not even facility planning or engineering, but rather maintenance schedules. Specifiers who want to generate repeat business make it their job to build in as many high-performing, low-maintenance design choices as possible. And from high-tech tile to washable paint and stain-resistant fabrics, they are getting better, more beautiful and even greener all the time.

Some people think that of all the finishes in a commercial project, fabrics are the most perishable. This is far from true. In fact, we’ve seen many cases where our fabric has outlasted the furniture itself. The first thing we recommend you tell your clients about Crypton for their peace of mind is to remember the performance attributes of Crypton stay in place for the life of the fabric. They can’t wear off, wash off or rub off, so Crypton never stops performing.

Giving your clients the scoop on keeping their Crypton fabrics performing spotlessly is simple. Most liquids will simply roll off and can easily be blotted with a clean cloth. For spots and stains that linger longer than a second or two, your clients just need to know the simple steps for spot cleaning.

SPOT CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS

The spot cleaning method of stain removal can be used for most light to medium stains:

  1. Before spot-cleaning, blot up liquids on the surface with a clean, soft towel and brush off any loose dirt.
  2. Prepare a cleaning solution of 1/4 tsp mild enzyme detergent, such as Tide®, Woolite® or Dawn® dishwashing liquid, per 1 cup of lukewarm water.
  3. Apply the cleaning solution to the affected area using a spray bottle.
  4. Work the solution into the affected area by lightly scrubbing the area with a sponge or soft-bristle brush. Make sure to work from the outside of the stain inward so as not to spread the stain, and rinse your sponge or brush frequently.
  5. Allow cleaning solution to soak into the fabric.
  6. Rinse thoroughly to remove all soap residue, as residue will attract dirt. Blot excess moisture with a clean, soft towel or sponge.
  7. Repeat steps 3-6 if needed.
  8. Allow fabric to air-dry.

If you still have questions, or should your clients come to you with a really tough cleaning question, we’re always at the ready. The Crypton Care department is available to provide advice, tips, Crypton cleaning products and complete contract specification support services. Call 800.CRYPTON (2797866) or email care@crypton.com for help between 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET. Chances are we can solve your tough cleaning problem on the spot, as it were.


It’s 2017 and as a designer, no matter how amazing your projects are, you’re nothing without images. You need them more than ever, and in a steady stream. For your website, for social media and for publications looking to cover your work, you continually need great images that reflect your talent and passion for design. We asked our marketing and brand strategy team as well as top design-centric public relations and advertising agencies for tips on amassing a portfolio that shows you and your firm in the best light.

Tip #1: Find a photographer that fits your style

Seek out photographers whose images compel you. Think of your portfolio as the book or magazine of your brand, and you are the art director and editor. As you flip through your apps – Instagram, Flipboard – take a look at the nuances of lighting, mood and perspective that define the look you seek. Check the feeds of influencers you admire, be they editorial entities such as design publications or leading design firms. Consider this when seeking out your own photographers for major projects:

  • Do you want to work with someone who prefers to use as much natural light as possible?
  • Someone whose style is bulbs off or bulbs on?
  • Windows blown out or showing the view, etc.

Fair warning, though, once you start noticing these things it is hard to stop, even in your leisure time.

Tip #2: Apply other disciplines to bring out the best

Consider that sometimes a residential photographer might be best for a hospitality project where the design is meant to feel luxurious. Similarly, an industrial project might benefit from the work of a fine art or archival photographer. Look at the annual reports of some top industrial firms to see great examples of this. Photographers can put an exotic spin on hospitality, theater, stadium or even office projects.

Award-winning travel photographer, Rick Lew, who has shot the most exotic and far-flung global destinations for Condé Nast Traveler, has in recent years become one of the most sought-after architectural and hotel/hospitality photographers.

Currently, one of the most popular Instagram images under #architecturalphotography is by travel photographer, Parisey. Check out his feed: @theworldisbigandiwantotseeit.

Architectural photography

Travel and architectural images from Paris and Bucharest. Photos courtesy of @theworldisbigandiwantotseeit.

Tip #3: Fortune favors the prepared

Try to have more than one photographer with whom you establish a creative rapport. That way, when your project is ready, you can tap into the talent that’s available within that often short window during which your client is willing to suspend business in order to capture your genius.

Architectural photography

Go hunting for styles you like on Instagram: #architecturalphotography.

Tip #4: Don’t forget styling

Often the styling is as important as the photography itself. In contract projects less styling is usually more, but none can be a disaster. This is particularly true anywhere you need soft goods styling, such as in hospitality environments where bed, table and bath linens can quickly take over within a shot and distract from your design work if not styled properly. These textiles need to be smooth and contained while still appearing soft and inviting.

Architectural photography

A random sampling from the insanely beautiful Instagram feed of Vogue Living Australia.

Tip #5: No current projects? There’s always something to share!

Often it can be months between the big shoots of entire projects, so in between, our experts recommend the following techniques for populating your social feeds:

Storyboards

Shoot your concepting process. This might be inspiration boards, drawings with swatches, renderings, scale models or some other device you use to illustrate concepts and themes. You can shoot these in a way that’s abstract so as not to reveal any proprietary information by showing a sliver or a slice along with other elements. This is also an opportunity to storyboard your own dream concepts, to design for the kind of projects you wish to get.

Along the way, you can create mini concept shots that focus on color stories through paint palettes, fabric and finish samples. These things CAN be beautiful. Designer David Scott, crafted an entire monograph (Outside the Box) on the strength of his concept trays and themed inspirations.

Architectural photography

Caviar, calfskin and the Chrysler Building figure into a design concept by David Scott. Photo courtesy of Pointed Leaf Press.

Curation

How do you see the world and what’s in it? This is as important as the original work you create. Many design pros wonder who will care about this, but as a design pro you are an opinion leader, and your singular take on anything from iconic landmarks to street art is part of your brand persona. If you admire the work of your colleagues in the field, share that as well. An open, generous sharing of ideas is more accessible than ever. Just make sure that you don’t put any image in your feed that you don’t love. Even if it means you don’t post from a particular event, it is better than posting something that doesn’t reflect your viewpoint on design. Remember, it is your brand’s magazine.

Designer David Scott beautifully curates the natural elements that inform his design in a spread from his monograph, Outside the Box. (Pointed Leaf Press)

Designer David Scott beautifully curates the natural elements that inform his design in a spread from his stunning monograph, Outside the Box. Photo courtesy of Pointed Leaf Press.

Architectural photography

Drapery in progress. Photo courtesy Marks & Tavano Workroom.

Works in progress

Turn that showroom or workroom visit into an opportunity for content. Shoot funky angles of a half-upholstered chair or come in tight on some finish detail that’s rocking your world. People love behind-the-scenes content and building anticipation before a final outcome is one of the strongest engagement tools in social media.

Do you already have great images of your work? Send them our way, and be sure to point out where you’ve incorporated Crypton fabrics. You may just see them published in this space or we may contact you to see if our PR teams can pitch them to design publications for editorial or social media.


The theme du jour is diversity. We think it is timely and relevant, whether we’re talking about the vast scope of new design products showing up at market, or the new emphasis on diversity in renderings. We look at what industry journals are saying about the renewed commitment to inclusiveness in the design field. No time like the present.

Scalies for the Real World

First, we offer this article from Curbed. It explores why some firms are placing importance on creating more diversity in architectural renderings. You’ll also discover the lengths some shops go to get an accurate portrayal of each site’s neighborhood. They also link you to great ‘scalie’ resources for incorporating into your next drawings. Try Just Nøt the Same, Escalalatina or Skalgubbrasil.

Turner Field Neighborhoods Livable Centers Initiative Study Design Distil for Perkins+Will

Turner Field Neighborhoods Livable Centers Initiative Study Design Distil for Perkins+Will. Photo courtesy of Curbed.

New Products That Run the Gamut

We spend 10 days a year at High Point Market, since our performance fabric technology is featured in some 60 showrooms there. We interact with designers, editors, bloggers, the famous High Point Style Spotters and of course we stop in to see all of the brands that offer our technology. As a result, too often we don’t have time to explore the show in the way we’d like.

Good thing our pal, Mark McMenamin from Interior Design magazine, has curated this superb selection of standout pieces in two categories: lighting and tables. From sinuous to geometric, earthy to colorful, there’s something for every designer who’s too busy designing to make it to market.

Duna chair by André Gurgel and Felipe Bezerra for Tissot Móveis.

Duna chair by André Gurgel and Felipe Bezerra for Tissot Móveis. Photo courtesy of Interior Design.

American Institute of Architects Leads Country in Commitment to Diversity

According to Architectural Record, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) intends to redesign the profession’s commitment to diversity, and recently released its Diversity and Inclusiveness recommendations in a new report that took 14 months to complete.

The Commission’s work focused on the implications of increased equity, diversity, and inclusion in architecture. Highlights of the actionable recommendations:

  • Expose children and families to architecture through K–12 Programs, with elements that help underrepresented groups to discover architecture.
  • Develop self-assessment tools to collect data on diversity and inclusion issues in the biannual AIA Firm Survey. Use results to establish best practices.
  • Create and publish best practice guidelines for architectural practices, covering such themes as career progression, work culture, pay equity, and talent recruitment.

This follows AIA’s $1 million contribution to its Diversity Expansion Scholarship, announced late last year in Architect’s Newspaper. Both summaries describe an AIA that is still finding its footing in the area of workplace diversity and the educational programs that will make it possible.

In the end, though, it was this article from The Architects Newspaper that gave us hope and inspiration. It is about the promise of inclusiveness and integrity across the entire profession in all areas of business practice.

How does your firm approach issues of diversity and inclusiveness? If you’ve discovered or implemented your own best practices then we’d love to hear from you. We might even ask you if we may share them in this space.


Make that next Uber ride a treasure hunt for beauty, form and color. Enliven your wait on the coffee shop queue by finding something inspiring that may perk you up even more than that five dollar latte. Here are some fun finds to add to your feed, and maybe to feed your designing soul:

1. @labatrockwellgroup

Come for the kaleidoscope of the week, stay for the the true definition of visionary. The LAB at Rockwell Group is an interactive design firm within the Rockwell Group blending strategy, tech and architecture to create memorable spectacles that bring people together. From the Academy Awards to Broadway to killer hospitality environments worldwide, their work speaks for itself. In the LAB, they seek to answer a question: How do you experience a world that doesn’t yet exist, and design for it?

It was an exciting day down at @_hudsonyardsnyc with the unveiling of the new monument “Vessel” by Thomas Heatherwick

A post shared by The LAB at Rockwell Group (@labatrockwellgroup) on

2. @michellenussbaumer

Our friend, designer Michelle Nussbaumer, has a dreamy travelogue of an Instagram. The editors of Architectural Digest named it among their “musts” last year, and we agree. With beautiful rooms of her own design, like the one pictured below in Mexico, as well as insightful and delightful snaps from her world travels, and her latest vintage and antique furniture and accessory finds for her peerless Dallas design emporium Ceylon at Cie, Michelle never disappoints. And, if you love her feed, you might wish to procure her new book, Wanderlust (Rizzoli), which has been flying off shelves from coast to coast.

I created this outdoor sala in Mexico to feel colonial but it’s all brand new. #mexicolindo #mntrippin

A post shared by MichelleNussbaumer (@michellenussbaumer) on

3. @studiomk27

This Brazilian architecture firm has a richly varied and often very tongue-in-cheek Insta’. We can’t stop watching the strange, slightly grainy black and white video of a uniformed housekeeper, complete with starched hat and white gloves, doing a little curtsey before pulling a carved wooden screen across what appears to be a lovely modern interior. We don’t get it, and we don’t have to. Architect Marcio Kogan has something here. It makes us smile. Italian ELLE magazine’s editors loved it, too.

Casa Abre e Fecha ??? 2016

A post shared by studio mk27 (@studiomk27) on

4. @design_bitches

Architects Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph, AKA “Design, Bitches” bring their eclectic expertise to Instagram. Their playful feed gives bite sized glimpses of their own restaurant designs, global collaborations in brand identity, commercial spaces, residential and cultural buildings. Their client list includes such diverse entities as Google, Rag & Bone, Coolhaus and Whole Foods Markets. The resulting Insta’ is so fab you almost don’t mind that their genius may be one reason you have to pay $6 for that scrumptious Coolhaus ice cream sandwich. They sprinkle the feed with scenes from their travels and quickie caprices like rainbows, blinky lights and, shown below, Disney’s Space Mountain, snapped at magic hour, when the light is just perfect.

#magichour

A post shared by Design, Bitches (@design_bitches) on

5. @roomonfire

If you’re mesmerized by circular staircases, rapt at repetition as a design statement and swoon over enfilade, this is the feed for you. Both stunning in its imagery and disciplined in its editing, Room on Fire satisfies. It is curated from things around the web by interior designer and stylist Chloe McCarthy. There’s also a Room on Fire Tumblr. This Insta’ isn’t only fun to follow, it is also an object lesson in Instagram best practices. She manages to achieve continuity while always offering up something new. And she gives credits where credits are due.

Would we love your Instagram? If so, please let us know using #CryptonFabric! And don’t forget to follow us @CryptonFabric!


Designers looking for some instant karma of the good variety for their next project will discover it offered up imaginatively in the latest collection of Crypton contract fabrics by renowned maker Architex. The 69-item BELIEVING collection tells a series of design stories inspired by the concept of global unity. According to Architex Marketing and Product Director Lauren Williams, “With the constant reminders of that which divides us all in the world, this collection aims to remind us to take a pause to remember at our core we are all the same. We are all humans who have hopes and dreams of love and laughter – but more importantly of freedom, of equality, of peace, of tolerance and of understanding.”

Among the things that can unite humans are architecture and design. The Architex design team took photos of key places: communities, architectural marvels and memorials with symbolic significance. From the edited photos came sketches, which were then translated into nine patterns, each in multiple color palettes. Says Ms. Williams, “Every motif represents a place where humans come together and connect face to face–creating instances where the beliefs in our similarities outshine our differences.”

L-R: Coexist, Kindred, Community and Lennon patterns from the Architex Believing Collection.

L-R: Coexist, Kindred, Community and Lennon patterns from the Architex Believing Collection.

The creative stimuli range from ancient to modern. A few highlights: The moving and poetic structure of a Santiago Calatrava bridge was the source of INSPIRE, a pattern of interconnecting arcs soaring into elongated diamonds.

Inspire pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Inspire pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Inspired by the recently unearthed mosaic floor of a Byzantine Monastery, CHRONICLE features a pattern of intricately intertwined concentric circles that dates back to antiquity, when stone mosaics were often employed to tell stories without using language.

Chronicle pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Chronicle pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Design elements from a contemporary public light rail train system create the COALESCE pattern. It eloquently represents the connection and unification of people and countries. In another pattern, PRESENCE, a collection of antique watches found at the Museum for Islamic Art loosely informs a series of small, open circles. Each tiny circle indicates a precious moment of time.

Presence pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Presence pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

The imaginative beehive structure of a Zvi Hecker apartment complex in KINDRED makes use of 720 different non-rectangular components to form a pattern that evokes stained glass windows or puzzle parts. It also speaks of neighbors and nature and how the human community is formed.

Kindred pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Kindred pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

LENNON is a reminder of the late musician’s devotion to political activism and his dream of a world filled with love and peace. The design is a takeoff from the famous “imagine” circle at the Strawberry Fields Memorial in New York’s Central Park.

Lennon pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Lennon pattern variations and concept art from the Architex Believing Collection

Another thing humans have in common is a need for interiors that work under the particular pressures and conditions of everyday life. This is especially true in the worldwide contract applications such as hospitality, office and healthcare where designers are specifying this collection. Woven in a polyester-acrylic blend and powered by Crypton performance, Believing fabrics are durable, cleanable and beautiful for all.

Although Architex conceived it some time ago, world events since have continued to put a finer point on the meaning of the Believing fabrics line. Turns out it is even more timely now than in its nascence. Notes Ms. Williams, “Meaningful and uplifting design is important. If we can put out any good and hopeful vibes, even in our business, if we’re able, that’s the goal.” We agree. One tribe y’all.

Are you a specifier and are planning to use any of the Architex BELIEVING fabrics in an upcoming installation? We’d love to hear about it and see a photo. Perhaps we can share your instant karma right here in this space!

All images in this post courtesy of Architex.